Union StUnion St

By David Edwards

Liv Willars

You have a great new band, they have brilliant songs and are amazing live but you need to raise their profile, so who do you call? Well – Liv Willars would be a pretty good place to start. Liv has been running One Beat PR since 2011, establishing relationships with over a dozen labels and representing a wide range of artists – mainly in the indie / rock / punk / folk sectors.

Raising an artist’s profile

“Labels will contacts us when they have signed a new artist, and we start by mapping out a press campaign across both digital and print media. We have also started working with American artists and labels who are trying to raise their profile in the UK. For example, we are currently working with Ezra Furman and we have been setting up a series of interviews and sessions across the key music websites.”

What makes a successful music PR agency?

“Probably the most important element is knowing the music and really being a fan. I spend a lot of time working with bands and labels, and attending gigs and festivals. If you weren’t really passionate about what you are doing it just wouldn’t work. I work with a network of really great people and I also get the chance to link up with people I have always admired – working on a recent Patti Smith release was a real highlight.”

Co-working at Union St

“I moved from London to Sheffield in the summer and soon went stir crazy working at home. A friend mentioned Union St and I have found it a really welcoming place to work with a good mix of people and some interesting connections. Several of the bands I represent played at the End of the Road Festival, and I found that one of the Festival’s founders, Sofia Genders, also works from here!”

You can follow Liv on Twitter here and visit One Beat PR here (both open as a new window). This article was written by David Edwards of Wordscount.

By Courtney

Kate Reeves Brown

What will you be doing at Union St?

Mainly writing regional cookbooks, editing recipes and proofreading.

How did you get into this area of work?

I have worked in publishing for nearly a decade. Having been an editorial assistant and assistant editor, I have been a book editor specialising in food and drink books for 8 years, working for publishing companies in London. I decided to go freelance when I moved back up north in 2015.

What do you enjoy most about your work?

I love getting cooking inspiration from new recipes, tips and techniques from authors and seeing the finished results of printed books. It’s a nice balance between creativity and attention to detail, which suits me perfectly!

What type of individuals / organisations are you looking to work with in the future?

Book publishers, websites, magazines… anyone who needs a helping hand with developing, editing or writing recipes or food-related copy. I can also do copy-writing, editing and proofreading for lots of other businesses, too, so it would be nice to expand into other areas.

What are you looking to get out of Union St?

A structured working day away from home, some friendly chat over a cup of tea and to meet some new people. Especially sharing problems and solutions to do with starting your own business and working on your own.

What is your Twitter address?

@katereevesbrown

By Courtney

Zoya Street

What will you be doing at Union St?

I use Union St as a space to work on writing, community management and research for my projects in the games industry — I love the creative, focused atmosphere and I like seeing people milling about. I am Senior Curator for the games writing curation site Critical Distance, Editor-in-Chief of games history publication Memory Insufficient, and a Japanese-English translator, as well as a part-time PhD student at Lancaster University. I also do consulting work in games, primarily assisting with world-building and constructing fictional languages.

How did you get into this area of work?

I first started researching games in 2011, while studying History of Design at the Victoria and Albert Museum; my plan had originally been to study Japanese ceramics, but the idea of writing a paper on video games crossed my mind and I ended up on a different path altogether. I soon started working freelance for games publications and games developers as a writer, editor and translator (Japanese-English). I have been combining academic research with an embedded critical writing practice ever since.

What do you enjoy most about your work?

The creative boundaries of games as a form are constantly being pushed in surprising ways. Often the most promising terrain is in the opposite direction to where everybody has been looking, and so incredible work can come out of left field. I love making sense of it all and grappling with the interpretive and creative challenges that a relatively young field brings.

What type of individuals / organisations are you looking to work with in the future?

As a writer, consultant and translator, I like to work with anybody who is creating media that connects audiences with other cultures, be that international connections, outreach with subcultures within the UK, or by immersing people in fictional worlds. I develop concepts, conduct historical research, construct languages and translate content, to help creatives to integrate their work with a cultural context.

What are you looking to get out of Union St?

I’d like to work from an uplifting space and get to know interesting people who are working on positive things. There is always something exciting happening from Union St and it is great to be able to feel connected with that.

For more information about Zoya and her work, visit rupazero.com and follow @rupazero on Twitter.

By Sarah Sharp

Philippa Willitts

Philippa Willitts is a freelance writer and journalist specialising in health and disability, women’s issues and tech writing. Her work has been published by the Guardian, Independent, and New Statesmen, among others. She is a skilled writer of SEO content, commercial copy and press releases, and has worked with many companies to maximise search engine exposure whilst retaining stylistic flair and clarity. She also offers serves as a proofreader and copyeditor.

Union St provides a more sociable environment for her to operate from, key for any freelance writer. She is especially interested in working with other freelance and digital professionals, and for Union St members is happy to offer 15% discount on any initial commission.

What I enjoy most about my work is the creativity and being my own boss.

Find Philippa’s full portfolio on her website: http://www.philippawrites.co.uk

Philippa Writes
www.philippawrites.co.uk
@PhilippaWrites
philippa.willitts@gmail.com

Liv Willars
Kate Reeves Brown
Zoya Street
Philippa Willitts